Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Ratatouille!


No, I am not going to write a review on this movie so you need not roll your eyes. (Though I must say it was a pretty good and meaningful show!) All of you would have probably watched this show by now and know the story. I am going to share in this entry a few statements made by a few characters in Ratatouille (pronounced as Rat-a-too-ee) which inspired me. Here goes;

This conversation took place in front of a store that sells items that kills rats.
... omitted parts
Remy's dad : This is the way things are, you can't change nature.
Remy : Change IS nature dad, the part that we can influence, and it starts when we decide (walks away)
Remy's dad : Where are you going?
Remy : With luck... forward!

This simple exchange between father and son reminds me of how the society at large is. Whenever they think it is not achievable, they will try to impose upon you that you too can't achieve what they failed to achieve. At the end of the movie, Remy did achieve his dream which is to be a chef despite the odds stacked against him (he is a rat for crying out loud!). The moral of the story is simple, if you truly believe you can reach the stars, go ahead and try! Society is conditioned to be your biggest dream-destroyer but never-ever let anyone tell you that you can't!

"The only thing predictable about life, is it's unpredictability" -Remy

Amen to this statement! We always try to predict what we can and cannot do. However, like this statement made by Remy, we can never predict life! I personally do not believe that our life is dictated by feng-shui or luck or some crystal bracelet. All we can do is to face life's unpredictability head on and always look at the positive side of the coin in order to overcome whatever life has to throw at us.

"In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk very little yet enjoy a position over those who offer up their work and themselves to our judgement. We thrive on negative criticism which is fun to write and to read but the bitter truth we critics must face is that in the grand scheme of things, the average piece junk is probably more meaningful than our critism designating itself but there are times when the critic truly risks something that is in the discovery and defence of the new. The world is often unkind to new talent, new creations... the new needs friends. Last night I experienced something new. An extraordinary meal from a singularly unexpected source. To say both the meal and its maker have challenged my preconceptions about fine cooking is a gross understatement. They have rocked me to my core. In the past I have made no secret of my disdain for Chef Gusteau's famous motto "Anyone can cook" but I realize only now do I truly understand what he meant. Not everyone can become a great artist but a great artist can come from anywhere. It is difficult to imagine more humble origins than those of the genius now cooking at Gusteaus'who is, in this critic's opinion nothing less than the finest chef in France. I'll be returning to Gusteau's soon, hungry for more" -Food critic Anton Ego on Remy's cooking

As Anton Ego beautifully mentioned in his comment, it is always easier to criticize others since the critic has little to risk and general public thrives on negative views. It is usually individuals who write scathing remarks on others that have a large following (I know my previous entries have generated a lot of interest amongst my friends as well as cost me a few friends as well. That is why I have stopped criticizing others unnecessarily). Instead of viciously criticizing what the other has or hasn't done, we should take put ourselves in his/her boots. Could we have done a better job? (You'll definitely say yes... now, nod with me in agreement that you will be able to do a better job). Since that's the case, why don't you take over whatever the one you are criticizing is doing? That would remove the need for you to criticize (You will not be stressed out and your relationship with the other would not suffer. Often I have encountered individuals who criticize their friends, employers or anything under the sun but they do little or nothing to help remedy the problem! If you just focus all your "criticizing-energy" into finding a solution for the problem caused by the one you are criticizing, you will soon find that it wasn't a such a big issue after all!

In addition, Anton Ego's comments also mentioned that "
not everyone can become a great a artist but a great artist can come from anywhere". This statement brilliantly illustrates that your environment or background should not be your excuse for not succeeding in life! Individuals such as Lee Sheng Chow (read "Blind But Standing Tall") can obtain a PHD despite being blind clearly shows that we human beings have limitless ability to achieve our dreams! All it takes is that you believe in your capabilities wholeheartedly and work hard (and smart!) based on your beliefs... the rest will fall in place naturally.

It is the first time an animation have inspired me this much. After watching this with my beloved Adel, I felt that my "motivation-batteries" have been recharged. To my readers, I would encourage you to watch Ratatouille and I hope it will inspire you as much as it had inspired me! Cheers!

3 comments:

ChangChee said...

wah uncle, u remember the whole review article by anton ego?
or found the script somewhere on the net?

Unka Chan said...

I downloaded the movie and listened to the part over and over again as I jotted down what he spoke.
That's how I got the script. :)

ChangChee said...

lol, thought u so geng, remember the whole script in 1 watch